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How To Use And Sanitize An Earspeaker

I recently attended a Women Tech Council event where attendees were able to tour the beautiful new Adobe building in Lehi, UT. We supported the event with a loaner equipment sponsorship of our portable RF equipment to ensure that not a single sound was missed.

Each tour member was given a receiver and an LA-164 ear speaker. The great thing about an ear speaker as opposed to traditional headphones is you can easily sanitize between uses. Additionally, it is only over one ear, allowing you to hear the audio while also being aware of your surroundings. The first time you put an ear speaker on it can be a little tricky, but once you see the proper position it’s easy!

This video shows just how easy it is to use and sanitize:

State EOC Gets Clear Secure Sound with Digital Infrared Solution

Listen Technologies Wireless Listening Infrared (IR) has changed the face of emergency management for command and control centers across the country.  
 
The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Massachusetts is using one such system. The fully digital IR system delivers exceptionally clear sound, and thanks to a higher-frequency band (2 to 8 MHz), is immune to distortion from ambient lighting – a critical component for an agency needing to be ready at any moment, should a public emergency arise.
 
Chaos is a natural by-product of emergency situations. So imagine a room full of personnel, other state agency representatives and, at times, reporters. Add in three 12-foot projection screens displaying up to 14 images and their related audio/visual feed of real-time news and weather from local, national, cable and satellite broadcasts simultaneously, 24 hours a day. The noise alone breeds chaos.
 
But with the Listen Digital IR system, audio feed is sent directly to the personal receivers, which deliver the sound into earpieces worn by personnel. Suddenly you have changed what John Tommaney, the agency’s response and recovery branch chief, refers to as a virtual “Tower of Babble” into an efficient center able to immediately access and address need.
 
The system allows users to tune their receivers to any one of the 16 channels, enabling them to “surf” through the various media sources for the information they need. Prior to acquisition of the Listen system the agency relied on six large monitors with full audio feed, some of which did not offer mute or closed caption capability.
 
The system proved its mettle immediately during a January blizzard. According to Tommaney, it took users a whopping 30 seconds to learn how to operate their systems. The ability to monitor audio sources without audio disruption and its related confusion was profound.
 
Another plus is the system’s increased signal security; no small thing for an agency housed in an underground bunker. The system is also flexible enough to be linked to individual computers or used for video/DVD teleconferencing.
 
The agency started out with a dozen units. Once the system’s exceptional, problem-free sound quality and its flexibility to grow with agency needs and emerging technology became clear, plans to acquire additional units began.

Thinking Outside The Box With Digital infrared

Listen offers many solutions for applications that require audio, but where running cables may not be an option. Some of these applications typically include assistive listening or language interpretation. But, because of its versatility, Digital Infrared can be used for so much more. This blog will focus on the use of this technology in unique, out of the box projects.

Before I share these interesting applications I just want to give a little education on the technology of Digital Infrared. I think this will help open your mind to the capabilities of Digital Infrared.
 
Digital Infrared Technology Differs From Analog
Even the though the frequency carriers are similar, the signal differs from analog to digital. The Digital Infrared system uses high frequency carrier signals (typically 2-8 MHz) to prevent interference problems with modern light sources. It also converts the incoming analog system to a digital signal which is compressed to increase the amount of information that can be distributed on each carrier. The compression factor is also related to the required audio quality. When the signal is received, it is demodulated and converted back to an analog audio signal. The Digital Infrared system can transmit audio in four different quality modes:
  • Mono, conference quality, maximum 32 channels (standard quality)
  • Mono, Hi FI quality, maximum 16 channels (premium quality)
  • Stereo, conference quality, maximum 16 channels (standard quality)
  • Stereo, Hi FI quality, maximum 8 channels (premium quality)
Okay, it’s time to think outside the box. Here are a couple of applications that are not a typical way of using Digital Infrared but that are providing a great solution for distributing audio.

The NASCAR Museum
The Belk High Octane Theater at the NASCAR is used for watching races on the giant panoramic screen. Here fans of the sport can purchase a ticket to the museum to watch the race, and tune into their favorite driver and listen to the radio transmissions with his/her team. The system can have up to 32 different drivers and team participate in the broadcast.  The system a can appease the ADA regulations of assistance for those in need. For many fans, this is a dream come true to be part of the action. A lot goes on in the course of the race, and now you are in the pit crew with the team.

The Riverside Community College
The Riverside Community College (RCC) Early Childhood Education Program provides an educational and practical foundation for students interested in working with children from infancy through third grade. In addition to theoretical principles, the curriculum offers practical skills and on-site training that will prepare students for employment in the field of Early Childhood Education
riverside-community-college
The center has two large rooms where the children can interact, play, and learn. Each of the two rooms has a glass wall between them forming two smaller rooms for a total of four rooms. The glass walls allow for observation by teachers, parents, students and doctors. There are two alcoves that allow a view of two rooms.
riverside-community-college
The Digital IR Radiator is placed in the alcove. Four microphones have been placed in each room to provide audio to the observers. The microphones are hanging shotgun style microphones and each microphone has a dedicated channel on the Digital Infrared system. It’s designed so that students, faculty, and parents can observe children without the kids knowing they are being monitored. 

Observers are using Listen/DIS DR 6032 Digital IR 32-Channel Receivers to scroll thru and pick up the audio from each microphone. Observers check out pack and headphone then follow instructions on the wall.

This solution allows observers to easily monitor each child in different developmental stages. Listen products are giving these students and professionals the ability to assist and guide children as they grow.

There are so many others applications. So, start thinking outside the box. Digital IR can provide up to 32 channels of crystal clear wireless audio anywhere you may need.

 

Observe, Listen & Learn With Digital IR

One of the many things I love about my job is knowing that what we do really does help people!

A perfect case in point is a recent Digital IR application our Regional Sales Manager, Michelle Shimizu and Ben Frederick of Audio Geer handled with the Riverside Community College (RCC) Early Childhood Education Program.

The RCC program provides an educational and practical foundation for students interested in working with children from infancy through third grade. In addition to theoretical principles, the curriculum offers practical skills and on-site training that will prepare students for employment in the field of Early Childhood Education.

The center has two large rooms where the children can interact, play, and learn. Each of the two rooms has a glass wall between them forming two smaller rooms for a total of four rooms. The glass walls allow for observation by teachers, parents, students and doctors. There are two alcoves that allow a view of two rooms. The Digital IR Radiator is placed in the alcove.

Observation alcove at RCC. Digital IR Radiator mounted above the windows.
   

Observation alcove at RCC for students,
parents, and teachers.

Four microphones have been placed in each room to provide audio to the observers. The microphones are hanging shotgun style microphones and each microphone has a dedicated channel on the Digital IR system. It’s designed so that students, faculty, and parents can observe children without the kids knowing they are being monitored.
 

The red arrows point to the microphones
hanging in the room.
   

The red arrows point to the microphones
hanging in the “Bear Room”

Observers are using Listen/DIS DR 6032 Digital IR 32-Channel Receivers to scroll thru and pick up the audio from each microphone. Observers check out pack and headphone then follow instructions on the wall.
 

Digital IR Receivers in charging case
for check out by observers.
   

Instructions on scrolling through
channels for observation.

This solution allows observers to easily monitor each child in different developmental stages. Listen products are giving these students and professionals the ability to assist and guide children as they grow.

And if that isn’t helping, I don’t know what is!

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